Category Archives: aircraft

“The Real Thing” For The Real Fling

In the mid-1950s,  the US aeronautical engineers and designers were struggling with a seemingly insurmountable obstacle.  That is, no matter how hard they tried, they could not get their latest fighter aircraft, the F-102 Delta Dagger, to break the sound barrier.

The shock waves encountered in the transonic realm proved too formidable…..until someone re-visited the theory of The Area Rule.  That simply meant that the cross-section area of the aircraft had to progress smoothly from tip to tail, without abrupt changes.

In practice, it meant that the fuselage had to be “pinched” in to takr on a Coke-bottle shape – in order to compensate for the cross-section area of the wings. 

Once they had “The Real Thing” designed in, everything went smoothly – the re-shaped F102 easily slipped past Mach 1,2 and they had a real fling from thence on. 

Give The Men A Tiger !

Circa 1975, after years, if not decades of putting up with flying “junk” from the obsoleted fleets of other countries’ airforces, TUDM decided it was time to upgrade and get up to speed, literally.

Bravo !  Give the men a Tiger !  And yes, 14 single-seat F5E Tiger II fighters and 2 two-seat versions were purchased from Northrop and added to the fleet. For the first time the airmen went supersonic, at Mach 1.6.

The salient features of this aircraft were the long sharp nose, and small wings.  It is amazing that such ‘tiny’ wings could bear up to more than 11,000 kg maximum take-off weight.

I think they have been replaced by other modern jet fighters and fighter-bombers.

Interestingly, in Dec 2007, several of the J85-21 engines that powered these jets were stolen and sold in the Uruguayan black market.

Da Plane ! Da Plane !

Hong Kong could well be a Fantasy Island to many folks from around the world, but landing on the old Kai Tak Airport was something of a nightmare for airliner pilots.

Kai Tak was un-enviably sandwiched between the mountains (of southern China) and the deep blue sea (of the Fragrant Harbour), and the landing paths airliners took had to almost scrape the rooftops of the densely packed high-rise buildings.

One misjudgement could crash the plane into the mountain sides or the buildings or the sea. 

For the passengers who survived those landings, looking out the windows was either a thrilling or harrowing experience to recall.  Sometimes one could see people waving up from the roof-tops.  “Da Plane ! Da Plane !” perhaps.

The last flight out was on 6 July 1998 – some 20 years ago.

Beyond Sound Agreement

In late 1962, the two European rivals, Britain and France, put aside their differences, and signed a treaty to jointly develop and produce a commercial passenger aeroplane that would fly beyond than the speed of sound.

The resultant aircraft — aptly named “Concorde” — was a magnificient engineering triumph and a showcase of mastery of aerodynamics.  It fired the imaginations of impressionable young techie-wannabes like me. 

But commercially, the project was an epoch failure – with the press calling it “The Fastest Flop”.  Skyrocketing oil prices especially in the years following the Arab oil embargo, made it economically unviable.  The rise of environmental concerns such as side-effects of the “sonic boom” also hastened its demise.

The crash of Air France flight 4590 on 25 July 2000 put the final nail in the coffin for this beautiful speedbird.

Tutors Turned Stingers

That was “How It All Began”, when in 1967, RMAF received its first combat aircraft – putting real ‘tentera’ into TUDM.

The 20 machines were Canadair CL-41G Tutors – basic jet trainers that could double up as light ground attack fighter-bombers. TUDM called them ‘Tebuan’ (meaning ‘Wasp’).  These remained in service until 1985.  They probably stung the CPM out of existence.

I remember seeing some of them flying over my old kampong house in Butterworth – sometimes low enough to make out the two airmen seated side-by-side in the cockpit. 

However, it was only in 2013 when I finally got to see a specimen really up close.  That was during a visit to the Muzium TUDM in Sungai Besi.  Oh, by the way, there is another exhibit at the Muzium Tentera Darat at Port Dickson.

Every Seat A Window Seat

Haha, this “ancient” piston-engined, propellor-driven, 9-seater Britten-Norman Islander BN-2 had something to offer that no modern airliners can!  And best of all, if odds were in your favour, you could land up next to the pilot in the cockpit…and that is full frontal view.

Years back (I think in the 70s), MAS had 4 of these rugged flying workhorses plying the rural routes in Sarawak and Sabah.  I have heard of many interesting stories as well as some hair-raising tales about flights on this plane.  Folks originating from East Malaysia should have some fond memories to share.

I was told that all passengers (apart from their baggage) had to be individually weighed and allocated seats in order to preserve balance in the air.  Sometimes live animals would be among the payload together with the passengers.

The Need For Speed

It was keenly felt long before 2014 (recall the movie ?) – some 6 decades ago, during the Cold War years.

Great strides were being made in aeronautical engineering, and flying machines of all imaginable shapes and sizes were launched in rapid-fire succession, each faster than the preceding one.   Mach 1 was exceeded on 14th October 1947, followed quickly by Mach 2 and then Mach 3 by the second half of 1966.    That was 3 times the speed of sound.

The Lockheed SR-71 with twin turbo-ram jets was the fastest of them all at 3,540km/h, while the North American XB-70 bomber (with 6 engines) reached 3,309km/h.

In 1970, the Soviets came out with its MiG-25 which could attain Mach 3.2 in short bursts (but the engines rpms were red-lined at Mach 2.8)

Those were the days when speed was king.